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#21
fuyugakuru

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You need to read your beacon manual. There is a setting on the BCA Tracker DTS, which can be turned on or off, that will make it automatically revert to transmit after five minutes in search mode. When you turn the beacon on, it will show either Ar (automatic revert on) or nr (no revert) after it does its self testing. Check the manual for how to change the setting. The manual is available online if you don’t have it any more. I would recommend turning it off if you are forgetting about it and letting your transceiver revert to transmit.

View Postippy, on 28 October 2013 - 09:50 PM, said:

Ive mentioned this before, but the expectation of the numbers you think youre going to see, and the actual numbers on the screen bare no relationship to one another until you learn how to follow a flux line. And that takes practice. If youre an old hand and know all this then obviously 2 antenna is no problem. Youll be no less quick out there. But if youre new, and your chances of practicing are marginal, in a shitty situation youll want the three antenna.

Both 2 antenna and 3 antenna beacons have to follow flux lines. The only thing the third antenna helps with is eliminating‘spikes’ where you lose the signal while doing the fine search. That being said, three antenna beacons are much better for the fine search and are simpler to use because of that.

If you are new and your chances of practicing are marginal, you should not be getting into shitty situations. You have to actively choose to expose yourself to avalanche hazards so make the right decisions to avoid them in the first place. If you make a bad decision and someone triggers an avalanche, the victim needs to get unburied within 10 minutes to get a decent chance of survival (80-90%). By 35 minutes the survival rate drops to about 10%. If you haven’t practiced, you are likely to take too long and dig out a dead friend.

View Postippy, on 28 October 2013 - 09:50 PM, said:

On that point, aside the course, the majority of my practice time came realistically from wandering around my boarding house finding the people who forgot to switch off their beacons after a day out on niseko. Its a great way to meet people d: Its all good practice for a two antenna since 3 meters might in fact just be downstairs and not in fact 3 meters away - all shit you need to learn about and work on).

While it may be a good way to meet people, this is pretty useless for practicing for a rescue situation. You should practice on the snow with a buried beacon in a bag that you have to search for, probe and then dig out. Digging takes the most time in a rescue so you need to practice digging efficiently and in the right place based on your probing. Otherwise, you are going to be woefully unprepared for the real thing.

#22
ippy

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all fair points :)
m00m

#23
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View Postgozaimaas, on 29 October 2013 - 06:43 AM, said:

A beacon that reverts to transmit when put in search mode is probably the most evil piece of equipment you could hope to have in a rescue attempt.


Not if you are searching and then get buried yourself! :( That's why they're designed like that. Of course, you can disable this feature if you like. I can tell you that I won't be!

#24
gozaimaas

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Yes but you have to keep on top of it. Its no good messing up everyone elses search with your false signal while someone is buried.
That is what i was referring to
In japan may 3-25

#25
ozsnowbum

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View Postfuyugakuru, on 29 October 2013 - 01:15 PM, said:

You need to read your beacon manual. There is a setting on the BCA Tracker DTS, which can be turned on or off, that will make it automatically revert to transmit after five minutes in search mode. When you turn the beacon on, it will show either Ar (automatic revert on) or nr (no revert) after it does its self testing. Check the manual for how to change the setting. The manual is available online if you don’t have it any more. I would recommend turning it off if you are forgetting about it and letting your transceiver revert to transmit.

View Postippy, on 28 October 2013 - 09:50 PM, said:

Ive mentioned this before, but the expectation of the numbers you think youre going to see, and the actual numbers on the screen bare no relationship to one another until you learn how to follow a flux line. And that takes practice. If youre an old hand and know all this then obviously 2 antenna is no problem. Youll be no less quick out there. But if youre new, and your chances of practicing are marginal, in a shitty situation youll want the three antenna.

Both 2 antenna and 3 antenna beacons have to follow flux lines. The only thing the third antenna helps with is eliminating‘spikes’ where you lose the signal while doing the fine search. That being said, three antenna beacons are much better for the fine search and are simpler to use because of that.

If you are new and your chances of practicing are marginal, you should not be getting into shitty situations. You have to actively choose to expose yourself to avalanche hazards so make the right decisions to avoid them in the first place. If you make a bad decision and someone triggers an avalanche, the victim needs to get unburied within 10 minutes to get a decent chance of survival (80-90%). By 35 minutes the survival rate drops to about 10%. If you haven’t practiced, you are likely to take too long and dig out a dead friend.

View Postippy, on 28 October 2013 - 09:50 PM, said:

On that point, aside the course, the majority of my practice time came realistically from wandering around my boarding house finding the people who forgot to switch off their beacons after a day out on niseko. Its a great way to meet people d: Its all good practice for a two antenna since 3 meters might in fact just be downstairs and not in fact 3 meters away - all shit you need to learn about and work on).

While it may be a good way to meet people, this is pretty useless for practicing for a rescue situation. You should practice on the snow with a buried beacon in a bag that you have to search for, probe and then dig out. Digging takes the most time in a rescue so you need to practice digging efficiently and in the right place based on your probing. Otherwise, you are going to be woefully unprepared for the real thing.


another good practice technique is to bury in sand at the beach.

#26
fuyugakuru

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The auto-revert feature could be useful but I don't think beginners or people unfamiliar with their beacons should be using it. A beacon going back to transmit and messing up a search is a far bigger risk than a second avalanche. It’s one more thing you have to remember in the crazy stress of a rescue situation; you are not going to be thinking clearly. Time is extremely critical so this could potentially make the difference between life and death for the buried victim.

Another thing to consider is that the safety of the rescuers comes first. The first thing you have to do is assess whether the area is safe before doing a rescue. If there is a high risk of a second avalanche burying the rescuers, you probably shouldn’t attempt a rescue. If the rescuers get buried, who is going to rescue them? You could get someone to not join the rescue and just keep a watch out for any other avalanches coming and warn the rescuers if one does. Whether the rescuers would be able to outrun another avalanche is another matter. These are hard decisions but things would only get worse if more people end up buried.

This is why making the right decisions before getting into an avalanche in the backcountry is so crucial. Self rescue using a beacon, probe and shovel just isn’t very effective. If you make poor terrain choices and end up in a terrain trap, you would most likely be buried so deep that there would be very little chance of you being alive when you get dug out. Only 4% of people who were alive when dug out were buried below 2 m.

If you are alive when you get dug out, that is just the beginning. You may have lost your skis / board or have injuries, either of which could prevent you from being able to move through the terrain. How are you going to get back to civilisation and get medical support?

Avalanches are avoidable so just don’t risk it if you aren’t sure about the stability of a slope. It’s not worth it.

#27
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View Postfuyugakuru, on 30 October 2013 - 03:21 PM, said:

The first thing you have to do is assess whether the area is safe before doing a rescue.


+1

#28
seemore

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Interesting viewing



#29
gozaimaas

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Great doco seemore
In japan may 3-25

#30
seemore

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yeah I am learning I just need to step up my riding a bit more and I may be ready for a decent hike soon

#31
SKI

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Yes interesting
A sport, a thing, a yogurt

#32
rider69

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This may have been linked but here is a good start.http://beaconreviews.com/transceivers/

#33
seemore

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Does anyone know any good books on basic Avalanche Safety

#34
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"Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain" by Bruce Tremper is what most people consider the "bible".

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/1594850844

It's worth having a look on the web too as there's some fantastic online avalanche resources e.g. http://www.avalanche...g/online-course

http://www.avalanche...ourse/Intro.asp

http://utahavalanche...r.org/tutorials

#35
seemore

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cheers mate

#36
gvm3373

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@ seemore, you need more than a book. focused education and experience, lots of experience. there are no shortcuts.
Go to nz or canada and do an avalance course. there any many courses run during each winter.

you seem like a nice guy, I dont wont to be on the end of a shovel digging you out because you or somone in your party made a bad decision.

#37
seemore

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yeah I don't really venture out of bounds but when we were riding last year gozaimaas pointed out a crack that I would have ridden over so just a bit of knowledge would be a good start.
on what to look out for.
Maybe a trip to NZ may be on the cards in few years when I retire and need something to occupy my time

#38
ozsnowbum

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i did the 4 day avalanche course in NZ which covers ast1&2. i highly recommend it. you're actually out in the field all day everyday and then discuss things further at night in the hut.
also you can actually find the ast1 course on youtube
another video series which is really good is throttle decisions on vimeo. its geared towards sleds but all the information is the basically the same.

#39
fuyugakuru

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You can take Avalanche Safety Trainling (AST) level 1 and 2 in Japan, both in Hakuba and Niseko. I don't know about AST 2 but you can take AST 1 in Australia as well. They are all the Canadian model course. You don't need to go to NZ or Canada to take the recreational level courses (though that would be fun too).

I would highly recommend getting AST 1.

#40
seemore

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yeah was going to do one in Niseko but staying in Rusutsu and transport and the chance that the 2 days will be epic snow put me off




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